Written by Guest Blogger, Michele Hix, Vice President, Sales – West Region, USA.
The power just went out. Is your phone ringing off the hook?
This week we saw widespread weather-related power outages across the northeast United States. PG&E issued a preemptive outage in California just days ago to reduce the risk of wildfire. No, you aren’t imagining it. Power outages due to the U.S.’ aging infrastructure, whether intentional or not, are on the rise.
As a contractor, when the lights go out, you probably get calls — lots of them, asking how quickly you can prepare a home for a generator.
And that makes sense. Generators are the go-to solution for your customers looking to keep the power on. However, your electrical expertise is essential for installation, particularly when it comes to choosing how to connect the generator to an existing electrical panel.
The two most common connection options for a generator are interlock kits and split bus panels. Let’s discuss the pros and cons ..

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Earlier in October, proactive grid shutdowns left millions without power in the San Francisco Bay Area. And just a couple days ago, a “bomb cyclone” knocked out power throughout the Northeast.
Across the U.S., the combination of extreme weather, aging infrastructure, and rising energy demand are placing greater stress on an ever-shakier grid. For hospitals, data centers, and industrial plants that have critical power needs, the time has come for action. It’s time to reconsider the way we produce, transmit, and consume energy.
Microgrids are a practical, proven solution to grid outages. So why haven’t critical facility owners scrambled to build them? The answer lies in two misconceptions, which I’ll clear up in this post.
Misconception #1: Microgrids are too expensive.
When I speak about microgrids to people who run critical facilities, they often ask me about affordability. For years, microgrids were financially out of reach for many. They were often custom-built using an array of ..

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Written by Guest Blogger, Richard Korthauer, VP, Home and Distribution Business.
Last week’s intentional power shut-offs across parts of California may have prevented devastating wildfires. However, they left homeowners wondering when — not if — it’s going to happen again.
Climate change, natural disasters, and growing power demands are putting pressure on our aging electrical grid. These factors and more are contributing to an increase in power outages across the United States.
If you’re worried about the next outage, you’re not alone. Fortunately, there are good options in the market that will help you keep your home powered during outages. Let’s explore three ways you can ensure your home’s power stays on, regardless of what’s happening with the electrical grid.
One problem. Three solutions.
Prepare for the next outage by weighing the pros and cons of short-term versus long-term fixes.
1) Short-term: portable generators
Let’s start with portable generators: a quick and easy ..

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Complexity has always been an issue in running IT infrastructure, and it doesn’t seem to be getting any better. If anything, judging from new downtime statistics, the introduction of new technologies could be adding to the problem. Thankfully, remote monitoring tools such as next-generation DCIM (data center infrastructure management) have become easier to use and, as such, provide a solution to the complexity problem.
More than half of IT mission-critical workloads are still running in enterprise data centers, but environments increasingly consist of hybrids with components distributed across multiple corporate locations, public and private clouds, data centers, and edge sites. In many cases visibility is poor, making it impossible to track all components from a central location. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out what happens then — a veritable management nightmare that has administrators clamoring for tools to help rein everything in.
A new study by the Uptime Institute shows ..

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